03 November 2012

C. and I are going to hang out and read on Tuesday. We may try to talk philosophy. She sounds sweet when she talks about her manic episodes. It's totally different than the way my sister gets upset. She did almost all of the talking the last time I saw her, which could be a low-level manic reaction to having her antidepressant increased because she was depressed. Or she just talks a lot.

6 comments:

lostgander said...

Sometimes I think I have a mood disorder. I've never been diagnosed, but I'm pretty sure something is not quite right.

wrenna said...

People generally only tend to do something that would lead to being diagnosed when they can no longer function in some way. On the other hand, you can always look at the way you tend to solve problems and ask how you would like your life to be richer. I think there's something to be said for not medicalizing every way that we are different, so long as by that we don't mean avoiding empathy.

lostgander said...

Good point about diagnosis. I have seen mental health professionals before, although never a psychiatrist. I agree about not medicalizing some of our differences. There is something artificial-seeming about this tendency. On the other hand I think people often feel some level of validation when they receive a diagnosis. Whether this ultimately helps them get better or not varies from person to person, I'd imagine.

Personally I am not a very good problem-solver. I tend to procrastinate as I over-analyze the situation in an excruciating, anxiety-inducing manner until the point where I am forced into a decision that I usually end up later regretting. I can look back and see the patterns. But this is probably not the right place to get into all of that.

wrenna said...

You, like me, would probably be labelled 'avoidant' with perfectionistic traits. I guess it's as good a place as any to get into it. Cognitive behavioral therapy is all about learning to see the strategies by which you would come to over-analyze as one of a set of flawed thoughts to be tossed out. I could recommend an online workbook by my former psychologist but if you're really serious about thinking this way it'd probably seem too shallow.

lostgander said...

That sounds like a fairly accurate label, actually. I do avoid, and I do have certain perfectionistic tendencies. I wouldn't say I'm a total perfectionist, but there are little things here and there that I am obsessive about. A psychologist I used to see counseled me using CBT. I guess it worked a bit at the time, but then my insurance ran out. I'm one of those people who knows what needs to be done to feel better but still avoids doing it. I'm also rather articulate about describing my mental and emotional states so I think the psychologist thought I was doing better than I probably really was.

wrenna said...

I wish it wasn't so. It's hard to tell what psychologists or psychiatrists are thinking when it's part of their job to stay detached.