25 January 2013

My new medication is making me feel extremely hungry. Eating doesn't help. It is really uncomfortable.

8 comments:

lostgander said...

How strange. I've never heard of that side effect. Do you think it is somehow altering your metabolism? I can imagine it must be uncomfortable. There are some days when I feel like that, no matter how much I eat.

wrenna said...

Most antipsychotics make you gain weight, but this one is supposed to have a minimal effect because it has a different mechanism of action. The information packet says that being hungry can be due to an increased blood sugar side effect, but I haven't been having the other associated side effects. In the end I ate one square of Lindt 85% chocolate and it went away. If that's all it takes, I am on board. I wonder how THAT works.

lostgander said...

Chocolate works in strange and mysterious ways. I never underestimate its powers.

wrenna said...

I think it has links to the neurotransmitter dopamine, the levels of which antipsychotics control. Its workings are complex and multifaceted, controlling the brain's reward system but also muscle movement.

lostgander said...

I prefer not to think about it at that level too much, but yes, I've heard that. Wikipedia says extraverts have higher levels of dopamine than introverts, but does not include a citation for this claim. What say you? Is that why I am so melancholic all the time? Should I just eat more chocolate? Because that could easily be arranged.

wrenna said...

Maybe you should binge on carbs in order to increase the levels of serotonin in your brain. Or consume ground flax or hemp seeds for the omega fatty acids. Or do all three at once. I mean, clearly the ultimate conclusion to which this line of argument is running is that you should just eat a pan of pot brownies.

lostgander said...

I made chocolate chip cookies. No pot on hand so that'll have to wait for another day, like when medicinal marijuana is legalized here and I suddenly develop glaucoma.

wrenna said...

Good idea. It's important not to go overboard when experimenting with your neurotransmitters.