11 January 2013

Yesterday I was looking for a place to eat my lunch when I ran into two girls from my Continental philosophy class in the sunny windowed room of the student union building. They said hello and talked a whole bunch of shit. They encouraged me to sit with them in the front of the class. Because I have to commute so long, when traffic is bad I arrive exactly when class starts and grab a seat where it is least disruptive, in the middle at the end of the row. Most of the class is boys, so it is nice we girls can stick together.

4 comments:

lostgander said...

I just saw this book on GoodReads and wondered if you cared to comment on its premise.

wrenna said...

I find God difficult to believe in. I think Jesus was probably insane. There are very obvious forms of social control that many, especially older, patients submit to, accepting their doctors as authorities while not even knowing their own medications are and what they do, or that schizophrenics suffer from what is called psychosis. I think this kind of submission is very sad, and these people ought to have resources to stand up for themselves and be active agents in their lives and treatment. I have heard psychotic people rambling about God, and I don't think it's really God that they see. Untreated psychosis usually devastates any sort of life that you would want to lead, and tends to get worse over time, leading to worse kinds of social and police oppression. It's true that psychotic people can seem very intuitive, and are very sensitive to stress, but they're not in control of it. That all said, I remain curious about what is out there beyond the medicalization of symptoms, which generally renders them meaningless.

lostgander said...

It does seem like completely eschewing the idea of treatment might not be such a great idea. I agree that this can lead to other problems, especially with the law. And here in the States we do not have good methods for dealing with mentally ill persons caught up in the criminal justice system. Mental health courts generally just set them up to fail, which leads to prison where their illness invariably worsens.

wrenna said...

Or it becomes their first treatment facility, as in the case of the guy who shot Gabrielle Giffords, which is tragic. I am fascinated by the case of James Holmes.